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BEC book
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Author:  twnpipe [ November 7, 2008, 1:33 am ]
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Just gave up on book order from Amazon, was late on shipping and then they said indefinite when it will come. Ordered from Ebay fron English firm with good history - wish me luck.

Author:  twnpipe [ November 16, 2008, 7:16 pm ]
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Received book in good order, had come in last 2 days as living a country life and only check a couple times a week. so 8 or 9 days from United Kingdom from date of order, amazingly quick

Author:  JackMcCornack [ November 27, 2008, 3:00 pm ]
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Mine just made it in from Motorbooks, I got a couple of 'em (Kinetic's a dealer for Motorbooks--that's where we get our Gibbs and Tanner books), one to read and one for stock...but I'll tell ya, I bought it (and waited and waited for it) because I wanted to know how to build a chain drive diff, and the chapter on the subject says basically that A) you should have one, B) a number of people have designed and built their own, and C) design and fabrication is left as an exercise for the student. Oh yeah, and you can buy a Quafe.

Grr. That seems like such a significant part of how-to-build-a-motorcycle-powered-racecar that I'd expected some genuine how-to. I feel like if I'd bought How to Build a Hot Rod and they told me that hot rods were a good idea and I could buy one from Chip Foose.

Author:  Mike Basden [ November 27, 2008, 4:55 pm ]
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Since the book was so helpful in this respect, maybe I'll do the same...

http://www.willrace.com/cdd.html

Lightweight AND expensive!

:)

Author:  Dauntless [ December 22, 2008, 1:17 pm ]
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Thanks for the link, KB58. Judging from the pdf it looks like a good common-sense book. I bought Aird's Race Car Chassis when it first came out, as I was thinking of building a bike-powered formula car, and this new book looks like it will nicely compliment Aird's work.

Author:  erioshi [ December 23, 2008, 10:28 am ]
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Mike Basden wrote:
Since the book was so helpful in this respect, maybe I'll do the same...

http://www.willrace.com/cdd.html

Lightweight AND expensive!

:)

I actually didn't mind it. While it's light on real engineering it does cover alot of ground and does a good job of raising questions a future builder will need to think about. I also enjoyed all the pictures, usually looking at different ways a given problem has been solved.

It's definitely not a cookbook, probably more like a project outline leaving the builder to fill in the details of how to solve each of the problems the book discusses. Also the very specific race focus might make the book less useful for someone looking for a street car reference. That said, I think there is enough good overall information to justify reading it.

Author:  KB58 [ December 23, 2008, 12:28 pm ]
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JackMcCornack wrote:
...I wanted to know how to build a chain drive diff, and the chapter on the subject says basically that A) you should have one, B) a number of people have designed and built their own, and C) design and fabrication is left as an exercise for the student. Oh yeah, and you can buy a Quafe.

I feel like if I'd bought How to Build a Hot Rod and they told me that hot rods were a good idea and I could buy one from Chip Foose.


I wondered if they did that, come right up to the most important aspect of building a BEC then veer away. Kinda like getting a date with a supermodel and it finishing with a handshake, "gee thanks, wait 'till I tell all my friends."

Author:  kikiturbo [ December 23, 2008, 1:43 pm ]
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I found the book "How to Build Motorcycle-engined Racing Cars" a bit light on the content for my liking..

for example, suspension geometry.... I would expect from someone that has built 3 cars to give the example of the numbers used and comment on the differences between the 3 cars, but no such thing given... just a comment like :"and then you plug the numbers into the computer and do lots of iterations.."

also nothing on chassis weight and stiffness..

there are some good ideas and rule of thumb comments, and for such it is value for money (for me) but it is far from definite BEC middy book..

Author:  JSullivan [ December 23, 2008, 2:23 pm ]
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kikiturbo wrote:
I found the book "How to Build Motorcycle-engined Racing Cars" a bit light on the content for my liking..

for example, suspension geometry.... I would expect from someone that has built 3 cars to give the example of the numbers used and comment on the differences between the 3 cars, but no such thing given... just a comment like :"and then you plug the numbers into the computer and do lots of iterations.."

also nothing on chassis weight and stiffness..

there are some good ideas and rule of thumb comments, and for such it is value for money (for me) but it is far from definite BEC middy book..


That's pretty much my thoughts.

Author:  Glen [ January 26, 2009, 4:21 pm ]
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I haven't finished the book yet, but I was impressed with the author's use of aluminum honeycomb panels. This is something I was planning to use in my designs, but I had never seen it taken as far as the author did, although he makes it sound like it's almost common over there I found it informative.

Author:  L8 apexr [ November 13, 2009, 5:32 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: BEC book

I was dissapointed in only presenting 1 configuration,engine in the rear with a chain drive and thats it.I know that layout makes the most sense but locost mentality isn't really about making sense is it?. :D

Author:  Miatav8,MstrASE,A&P,F [ November 14, 2009, 7:17 am ]
Post subject:  Re: BEC book

A driveshaft adapter and unmodified irs makes more sense to me, even for a middy. Legends racers typically use chevette and toyota suspension and a driveshaft adapter.

Steve Smith has a book called "Dwarf Car Technology" with a lot of good information in it, even if your not building a BEC. He seems to think brake pressures are higher on a race car than a stock car but otherwise, it is very good.

Pashley has a bec book I'd like to checkout.

I don't use Amazon for books anymore. Alibris is a much better deal, used or new.

Author:  JSullivan [ January 16, 2011, 10:54 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: BEC book

Miatav8,MstrASE,A&P,F wrote:
Pashley has a bec book I'd like to checkout.


I stopped back in here for the hell of it-thus the response in such a dead thread. But just in case people miss it, that's the book we're talking about. :lol:

Author:  TRX [ June 30, 2011, 4:29 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: BEC book

Miatav8,MstrASE,A&P,F wrote:
He seems to think brake pressures are higher on a race car than a stock car but otherwise, it is very good.


Until the carbon-metallic composition pads came out, that was true. The old style sintered-iron racing pads had to be thoroughly hot before they worked much better than opening the door and dragging your foot; on track days, you'd make the first couple of laps with your left foot resting on the brake pedal.

Author:  Johnsinski [ April 25, 2018, 12:09 am ]
Post subject:  Re: BEC book

Hello, new to forum. This book is available on Google Play for around $15. I couldn't resist, and so it has begun.

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