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PostPosted: January 11, 2018, 6:06 pm 
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Even if you are concerned about the issue, there are various tricks to minimize it. You can dip rivet heads in various primers, etc., to help isolate them a little from the steel, dab sealant in each hole before riveting, etc.

Realistically, short of driving in salted-road winter conditions (unlikely, or at least unwise, given the limitations of the car's design), the problem will in all likelihood never arise.

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PostPosted: January 13, 2018, 4:23 pm 
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Stainless steel rivers aren't that much more expensive

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PostPosted: January 13, 2018, 11:39 pm 
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FieroReinke wrote:
Stainless steel rivers aren't that much more expensive

That’s what I’ve decided to use...

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PostPosted: March 10, 2018, 9:12 am 
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thehiddenproject wrote:
Is there a problem about using aluminum rivets into a steel frame?


Basically no. Some more info for consideration.

There is a shelf life to aerospace fasteners when the bag is opened. Most blind rivet sleeves are 5052 or 5056 alloys aluminum due to there formability. That grade is of aluminum posses better corrosion resitance than say 2xxx or 7xxx. these fasteners are typically also cadmium plated AND have a cetol alcohol lubrication. This coating also provides a degree of corrosion resitance in addition to its lubrication properties. Manufacturers recommend keeping fasteners in closed bags until use to protect the coating.

5056 or 5052 being common blind rivet materials should offer that protection in there alloys. I see no issue using these. It is common practice to install rivets "wet" with primer or sealant to protect the hole base metals, I second zetecs thoughts.

Sealant only under the head and primer under the head and on the sleeve. Sealant on the mandrel or on the sleeve may cause early pin break or "hydraulic" in the hole and cause imcomplete hole fill.. thats not my opinion, but manufactures guidance. A little goes a long way and too much goes the wrong way.

As for the mandrel, you are most likely to see a trail of rust from the unprotected fractured mandrel on the head of the rivet.. this is negligible in most cases, even on aircraft.

Do it, you may consider giving the joint more longevity with a "wet" instal and or using a plated fastener.

Andrew

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PostPosted: March 11, 2018, 2:34 pm 
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> cetol alcohol

You can buy that cheap on eBay if you want to dip your old dry rivets into something...


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PostPosted: April 1, 2018, 5:05 am 
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Question: Are cheaper rivnut pliers functional, or do you need something that squeezes the rivnuts harder? I'm dealing with 5mm rivnuts.

Thanks.
Cory

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PostPosted: April 1, 2018, 8:31 am 
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Cory
If you have aluminum riv-nuts it will not be a problem. If using steel, you should just use a good grade bolt, some washers, and flat or angle stock to it while tightening. Dave W


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PostPosted: April 1, 2018, 11:31 am 
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I have an "El Cheapo" rivnut tool, and it's a PITA. Sometimes you can't get it to unscrew from the now-installed rivnut, without unscrewing all the innards of the tool, and you're forced to try to spin the entire foot-long tool to get it loose. In almost every case, there simply isn't room to swivel the whole %$^# tool.

I've resorted to using bolts, washers, etc. instead of the tool whenever space is limited and, although this works, it too can be a PITA, trying to juggle bolts, nuts, and washers in a place where there's only room for the fingertips of one hand. Most of my issues occur as a result of frequently having to use metric rivnuts, because my rivnut tool has no metric mandrels at all.

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PostPosted: April 1, 2018, 4:11 pm 
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Thanks guys. I really don't want to be using nuts/bolts on this many rivnuts. My hands aren't great for squeezing pliers either so I may build a tool that works with an air ratchet or similar.
Yeah, steel rivnuts btw.

Cheers.

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PostPosted: April 1, 2018, 7:50 pm 
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C10CoryM wrote:
Thanks guys. I really don't want to be using nuts/bolts on this many rivnuts. My hands aren't great for squeezing pliers either so I may build a tool that works with an air ratchet or similar.
Yeah, steel rivnuts btw.

Cheers.


I have actual rivnut/nutsert tools at work and can try and find a link online. Brb.

Welp, can't find a similar one online, with have to find it at work. Looks like a drill chuck but the tip the touches insert is serrated and a threaded rod spins within it. Pretty sure it's one tool with different size attachments. We use a lot of 3/8 inserts

part of a pneumatic system like this link

http://www.srcrivet.com/product_pdf/69.pdf


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PostPosted: April 2, 2018, 9:40 pm 
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Thanks Terry.

I'm a little surprised at how hard it is to find tools for this online. You'd think they would be super common.

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PostPosted: April 3, 2018, 8:01 am 
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C10CoryM wrote:
Thanks Terry.

I'm a little surprised at how hard it is to find tools for this online. You'd think they would be super common.


I used rivnuts alot on my land rover. I never actually used the tool, just drilled a tight hole, tapped the rivnut in and used a 1/4" impact to tighten the bolt which also snugged the rivnut into place.

If i wanted to do anything different, id probably just get a couple washers and grease between them. The idea is to NOT put any rotating pressure on the head of the rivnut

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PostPosted: April 3, 2018, 9:11 am 
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terryjr wrote:
C10CoryM wrote:
Thanks Terry.

I'm a little surprised at how hard it is to find tools for this online. You'd think they would be super common.


I used rivnuts alot on my land rover. I never actually used the tool, just drilled a tight hole, tapped the rivnut in and used a 1/4" impact to tighten the bolt which also snugged the rivnut into place.

If i wanted to do anything different, id probably just get a couple washers and grease between them. The idea is to NOT put any rotating pressure on the head of the rivnut


I've done the same. Except I use a hardened bolt to pull it into place then use a lower grade for the real assembly. I usually add some lube on the threads to prevent galling and reduce the tendency to rotate the Rivnut.

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PostPosted: April 3, 2018, 3:53 pm 
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Another way to avoid turning the rivnut is to put a bolt through, but don't turn the bolt to set the rivnut - use a nut & washer, on the bolt, and turn the nut, instead of the bolt, while holding the bolt with a wrench or socket. That way, there's no turning input on the rivnut at all, and it will never turn. Once it's set, back the nut off, spin the bolt out with your fingers, and you're done.

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PostPosted: April 4, 2018, 5:34 am 
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terryjr wrote:
I'm a little surprised at how hard it is to find tools for this online. You'd think they would be super common.


www.mcmaster.com I've got a few of their wench driven rivnut tools and they work great. On Mcmaster.com search "Rivet nut tool" and they're about halfway down that page.

Alex


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