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Learning how to build Lotus Seven replicas...together!
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PostPosted: September 16, 2011, 3:41 pm 
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Joined: July 26, 2010, 10:37 am
Posts: 750
Location: Tennessee
Get a drill press and make sure it's a pretty heavy one. Age doesn't matter. A floor model is best but a heavy bench model will work, then get a horizontal band saw. I didn't get a band saw but I should have. Makes life much easier. Did I say get a drill press? Also two angle grinders. One with a cut off blade and the other with a grinding disc. A coffee maker in the shop so you don't track metal shavings into the boss's house(a real no-no), or if you prefer the colder type beverage, a small fridge stocked with your favorite brew, although be careful mixing your favorite brew and power tools, wouldn't want to loose any digits or any more important parts.


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PostPosted: September 16, 2011, 5:43 pm 
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We are Slotus!
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Joined: October 6, 2009, 9:29 am
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Be careful mixing coffee with those cold adult beverages. Said mixture makes for a reaallly energetic drunk. One night, on a dangerous mix of Guiness Stout and Community coffee with chicory, I accidentally dis-assembled the entire suspension and steering of an MGB...
Peace Out-
Bubba


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PostPosted: September 16, 2011, 6:03 pm 
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Location: Tennessee
GonzoRacer wrote:
Be careful mixing coffee with those cold adult beverages. Said mixture makes for a reaallly energetic drunk. One night, on a dangerous mix of Guiness Stout and Community coffee with chicory, I accidentally dis-assembled the entire suspension and steering of an MGB...
Peace Out-
Bubba

It was the chicory.


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PostPosted: September 16, 2011, 7:48 pm 
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Joined: April 12, 2010, 5:40 pm
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Location: san francisco bay area
GonzoRacer wrote:
Be careful mixing coffee with those cold adult beverages. Said mixture makes for a reaallly energetic drunk. One night, on a dangerous mix of Guiness Stout and Community coffee with chicory, I accidentally dis-assembled the entire suspension and steering of an MGB...
Peace Out-
Bubba


:rofl: :rofl:

Out here one of the current fad drinks seems to be Red Bull and Jack Daniels. .. :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: September 16, 2011, 7:51 pm 
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Joined: November 13, 2009, 8:43 pm
Posts: 497
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
oldejack wrote:
Jack Daniels. .. :mrgreen:


Jack Daniels??

http://www.epicmealtime.com/ (Warning: will make you extremely hungry, or extremely not hungry)


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PostPosted: November 5, 2012, 3:08 am 
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Joined: October 16, 2012, 2:25 pm
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should i buy a tig, mig , arc


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PostPosted: February 12, 2013, 12:27 am 
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Joined: November 7, 2008, 4:48 am
Posts: 1094
Location: snow city - it's wet!
Storage, storage and more storage! This is a re-post of some information that I posted in a member's build thread when they asked about keeping all of the hundreds of parts associated with a build organized.

My solution for organizing small parts and sub-assemblies is a collection (about 15 to 20 total) of cheap plastic bins (baskets?) of different sizes, a few cardboard boxes and some large storage bins. I have four different sizes of the small bins from about 16"x16"x24"(?) all the way down to about 3"x4"x8"(?). I also keep a couple of empty, clear plastic "tackle box" type containers for some of the really small stuff. I also keep both normal zip-loc sandwich bags and the large zip-loc freezer bags in the toolbox along with a sharpie. I like the bags with the white area to write on.

And I label everything ... more-or-less. I use sandwich baggies and sharpies for really small stuff that needs to be kept together (and then that can go into the right bin), use tape labels on bins, and use tape labels on boxes & plastic tubs for the stuff that ends up in those.

Then I just dump the appropriate parts into the bin, box or tub associated with that sub-assembly and forget about it. What's nice is that the bins can be stacked (assuming non-delicate parts on the lower bins) and stuffed onto shelves to saving me space when I'm working on other things. The large parts just get carefully stacked on the shelves.

Oh yeah, shelves, lol. We all have them, but I have one large set of shelves strictly dedicated to just project and car stuff - nothing else goes on them. It allows me to keep everything from getting buried behind all the other normal household stuff that goes on those other shelves, lol.

It's a pain when I'm writing, sorting, bagging & tagging when I'd rather be doing "real" work, but I find I can come back to a project after a year or more away and still find everything quickly when I need it. It also helps in sorting out how all those "how did that go again?" parts fit together by having all the supporting bits collected into a single bin.

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PostPosted: February 12, 2013, 1:27 am 
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Joined: July 4, 2006, 5:40 pm
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Location: Novato, CA
erioshi, you are a clever and creative guy, but this much organization can take all the fun out of a build. My solution: keep everything in plain sight. Maybe not all of it in the garage, but the kitchen, bathroom, and other places you tend to frequent. Eventually you'll learn where everything is, and when the time comes to install a part, it won't take but a week or so to find it.

Of course even I keep the little tiny bits in plastic bags, and those plastic bags are around here someplace.


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PostPosted: February 12, 2013, 2:23 am 
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Location: snow city - it's wet!
One trick is to avoid having to do all the labeling and bin filling yourself. Frequently, I end up with friends looking to help, hang out or just visit while I'm in the garage. I hand them the baggies, bins and sharpies and ask them to do the labeling and sorting. You can even switch off with them on wrenching and writing when it's time to pause for a tasty beverage.

And while all that organization does sound painful, it's usually not all that bad once you get used to working it into a project. Plus being able to bring everything associated with a project off the shelves in 5 to 10 minutes, even after a year or two of being dormant, and be 99.5% confident (and safe in that confidence) that everything I need is there is fantastic. No hunting for anything or wondering if I remembered to order it. If my parts list shows it as here, I know it's right here, right now.

Now I don't go these kind of extremes with short projects. Anything I plan to finish that day or that week may get stuffed into a bin on the workbench, but the excessive labeling, filing sorting stuff is saved for long-term projects and parts that I know will be sitting for a while.

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PostPosted: February 13, 2013, 2:58 pm 
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Joined: October 19, 2009, 9:36 pm
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Location: meadview arizona
if i'd done that, i could have built my car in six months not three years!

the real trick is to get it done not put the parts on the shelf at all just fit them.

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PostPosted: October 30, 2013, 10:51 am 
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Joined: August 11, 2011, 10:10 pm
Posts: 23
Location: Richmond Ky
I just read this tread, And I have some zip lock freezer bags and a bunch of sharpies in my garage. Somewhere................


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PostPosted: November 25, 2013, 11:46 am 
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Joined: August 1, 2011, 12:09 pm
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I bought a digital level from Wood Workers Warehouse when I was building my Elva Courier frame. Think it was called "Pro-Level". I had no drawings so I had to copy the rusted frame. It was great for setting up the main (round) tubes and the inclination of the canted tubes. Don't know how I could have done it otherwise without creating complicated jigs.
Many of the cheap drill presses at HF are awfully loose. Crank the spindle down almost full stroke and try to rock the chuck. If you feel play it's probably going to chatter when you try to drill larger holes.


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PostPosted: November 21, 2015, 4:42 pm 
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Location: Morrisville, PA
If you don't have a combination square yet I recommend buying a LaGesse LaSquare. It has a 2" wide base that i have found invaluable when marking tubing, squaring up jigs and just general wood work and pattern layout. I have also bought a few standard 10/100 graduated rulers from ebay for when I need to do accurate layouts.

http://weldmongerstore.com/products/lag ... re-las-12s

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PostPosted: November 22, 2015, 3:10 pm 
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Joined: August 19, 2014, 5:17 pm
Posts: 685
Location: England
I have found a solution to streamline various operations when car building. I have pigeonholed various boxes that contain the kit for jobs like riveting , welding etc. EG If I need to rivet something every thing to do with that operation is in the one box, the drill, the various drill sizes relevant for the rivets, the various types of riveter and a full selection of rivets. This works so well I have done the same for the welding kit and many other ops. I have even decanted the grinder into one along with all the various types of discs, goggles face masks and gloves. Its amazing how much tidier you can work with this system, you just need to force yourself to pack it away as you finish.

Bob

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PostPosted: November 26, 2015, 8:48 pm 
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Joined: November 13, 2015, 1:26 am
Posts: 88
Location: Central Kentucky (Winchester)
I have been doing steelwork for many years and there are two tools I use all the time. A drill press and a portaband. I am on my second one. The first one lasted fifteen years. Milwaukee rocks.


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