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 Post subject: My MGB Motored Locost
PostPosted: September 20, 2019, 3:13 pm 
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Joined: June 20, 2019, 12:34 pm
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Well, we finally moved, unpacked, and I have my shop area semi- arranged!

So now its time to start my build. I was tough for several weeks to walk by it and not start. But for my wife's sanity and my wellbeing ( :boxing:), I resisted.

But it did give me time to review what I had and where I wanted to go with the build. I have decided to change up a few things from my original direction. After a lot of review of the Lima 2.3L motor, I made the decision not to go that way. Trying to get it licensed in Mass. was more than I wanted to take on.

Plus, a friend of mine, who helped me move it home, offered up his 71 MGB complete drivetrain! I will need to go thru the motor (been sitting for a few years), but the trans rebuild was done shortly before it was all pulled to have a Chevy V6 swap not on the MGB.

I started to review the build quality and am very happy overall. But a few things needed to be changed for the build to fit me.

You see, the gentleman who started the build was about 5" shorter than my (I'm 6' 2"). I soon discovered that the fixed seat position is a little too close to the steering wheel. And the Wilwood floor mounted pedals were impossibly too close for my legs & feet! So I ordered the compact Master Cylinders from Summit and after checking for room, moved the pedals forward 4 3/4". Plus, I plaved around with the steering column and got it moved up about and 1" higher to make room for my thighs



I will need to add another plate to the bottom in front of the existing plate. Plus, I will add a vertical firewall plate at the front of the pedal assy and thru bolt the Master cylinders. The throttle pedal would strike the sidewall if I add it to the inside of the frame in that forward location. So I think I will attach the panel to the outside of the tubes just there. That gives me full movement of the throttle and with the smaller MGB trans, I should have no problems. The remote reservoirs will mount up above the pedal box. This will also keep any leaking brake fluid( all MC's leak sooner or later) from dripping into the pedal box.

Have yet to cut off the mounting tabs for the Kirkey Racing Seat. The seat would juts squeeze into the frame. So I took a couple of clamps and squeezed the aluminum sides in just enough to make clearance for the seat and the padding. I will next cut off the mounting tabs for the seat and look at adding a seat track for adjustability. I have found the Porsche 914 seat tracks are easy to adapt and the driver's seat will also rock to add a tilt function!

Attachment:
914 seat track.jpg
914 seat track.jpg [ 11.97 KiB | Viewed 184 times ]


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PostPosted: September 20, 2019, 3:46 pm 
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Help, I cannot attach more than 1 image!

Thom


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PostPosted: September 20, 2019, 4:26 pm 
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Joined: April 22, 2010, 4:43 pm
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Location: Livermore, Calif.
Will-
You skipped a few steps in your new build log. What did you start out with and why? You're all of a sudden talking about new pedals and seat racks. What are you putting all this into? Did I miss another build log?

Cheers,
Roy

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Build log http://www.locostusa.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=16510


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PostPosted: September 20, 2019, 4:51 pm 
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Pictures are attached individually. Just repeat the whole process. There may be a maximum number but it is something like 12. Warning: the first picture you attach appears last on the post and the last appears first. So think about posting order.

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Isuzu Pickup/SR20DE, +401 COLD frame
Build Log: viewtopic.php?f=35&t=11601


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PostPosted: September 20, 2019, 9:40 pm 
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Sorry Roy, I had initially posted an intro a few weeks ago with the kit.

I had acquired a partially built frame from a gentleman in the greater Mass area. He had built it to accept a Ford small block. It has a "built" 8.8 rear end with Moser axles, 411 gears and drum brakes.

He had, in the past, built 1/4 mile race cars based on early Mustangs with 400 HP - 600 HP motors. So when he built this frame, he planned on a 300 HP 5.0 with a T5.

The entire front end is Mustang II with Chevy single piston calipers. He built custom A-Arms. The wheels are 15" with Toyo Proxys. An aluminum Mishimoto Civic rad. He also had the Kinetic's nose & Scuttle. He also had the rear fiberglass fenders and steel "trailer" front fenders.

He used Chrome Moly N grade round tubing to withstand the power. He had TIG welded the entire frame. But I need to roll it over and finish weld the bottom as well as a tabs & plating for the rest of the frame. Plus whatever mods I want to add (motor change, seat rails, etc.).

He kept the empty block & T5 housing.

I am trying to build something a little more "streetable" and thinking 300HP is a bit much!

He supplied me with the receipts for the build and he had over $5k in just parts & material!

All in all a good start for $3500.00 price.

PS- what you see in yellow is cardboard templates.


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PostPosted: September 21, 2019, 1:45 am 
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I give you ten style points for NOT using a late model computerized whazit engine.
Ten more for using a British engine in a British replica build.
Your chassis should be nearly indestructible with the B engine. :D

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PostPosted: September 21, 2019, 6:57 am 
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Thanks RichardSIA. I kind of felt the same way.

Interestingly (to me at least- you may fade off in the boredom at this time) when I wanted to buy my first car. For the year before I tuened 16, I walked by a parked red Sunbeam Alpine in front of a small industrial business with a "For Sale" sign in the back removable hardtop window. Its bright red paint now dulled by the San Francisco, California sun. I finally called the number and the owner told me he had parked it with a knocking rod. Otherwise, it was in great shape.

I dragged home the Series 3 Alpine with a dead motor. My schoolmate's father next door was a Ford mechanic and work at home in the evening on other peoples cars. He said he would guide me thru an evaluation of the sick motor. He instructed me how to take off the pan and see how bad the knocking rod damage was. He even loaned me tools!

The damage was not that bad- just a spun bearing. A crank could be replaced or reground, but my neighbor recommended I pass on the car. Always regretted that decision. Turns out my neighbor had a bias against foreign cars!

So after a series of American cars, I finally purchased my first British car in 1970 after I graduated from High School. I bought a 1956 Jag XK140MC coupe. It became one of several British cars over the next few decades which included an MG Midget, a Heally 100-6, a couple of MG 1100s, a Healey Bugeye Sprite and a 83 Jag XJ6.

I learned to respect and fear Lucas- Price of Darkness! And self oiling under chassis!

But though they were not as fast as, say my highly powered 55 Chevy Bel Air, they always supplied spirited fun.

Recently, I had the pleasure of visiting JPS Europa and his modern powered Locost. It was a blast to drive with its responsive 168 HP Toyota motor. And very quick to accelerate up to speed. Plus the lighter motor did add to the quick and sharp handling.

But as I have pondered the end result of a modern car, I still had memories (at my age you tend to have a lot of those) I kind of missed the distinct exhaust sound of the BMC powerplants as it works to reach it requested speed under your prodding throttle foot trying to make a new, deeper, depression in the firewall.

Nick's MGB Build has really convinced me to go this route with my build. It may not scorch the blacktop, but it will help me recall the memories of cars past.

Thom


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PostPosted: September 21, 2019, 8:00 am 
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BostonWill wrote:
Help, I cannot attach more than 1 image!

Thom


You've not posted anymore pics so I guess the problem remains. Each pic must be added one at a time. You successfully added one pic. The pop up window said it was working on it, the screen refreshed, and the pic was loaded. At that point, you repeat the process to add a pic as needed.

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PostPosted: September 21, 2019, 9:51 am 
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Location: West Chicago,IL
The MGB powered Locost should bring you a lot of fun. I thought of using the same donor, or even an MG Midget, if I ever built another Locost. Instead, I'm now working on 2 MGB's. One is a chrome bumpered MGB-GT that will get a more modern drivetrain, a semi-modern V6, Auto trans, wit A/C. That will take me several years to finish. In the meantime, I just bought a rubber bumpered roadster to get me thru that period. Currently sorting that on out.

"They" say that driving a slow car fast is more fun than driving a fast car slow. I subscribe to that saying.

I look forward to seeing your progress. :cheers:

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PostPosted: September 21, 2019, 11:50 am 
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Location: Livermore, Calif.
Sorry Will. I should have gone back to your earlier posts. I now see your introduction.

http://www.locostusa.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=19827&p=248894#p248894

Looks like you've got a good start on a project.

Good luck,
Roy

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PostPosted: September 21, 2019, 7:09 pm 
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Location: Seattle area
Thom,

I think the 914 sliders are a great choice. Should adapt to your alloy seats, no problem.

I bought all my 914 seat stuff about 5 years before restoring 914s became a thing. I was bought 2 seats with sliders for less than what people are asking for just the sliders these days.

A lady I worked with in the early 80s had a 914 they were wanting to sell. Took 2 years to sell and the price kept dropping. I don't recall for sure but I think the she and her husband started at $3K and sold it for less than $2K.

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