LocostUSA.com

Learning how to build Lotus Seven replicas...together!
It is currently August 18, 2018, 12:00 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 162 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Author Message
PostPosted: February 18, 2018, 3:41 pm 
Offline
Toyotaphobe
User avatar

Joined: April 5, 2008, 2:25 am
Posts: 4691
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
What HP did you guys make on the dyno. I've seen probably 100 S2000s on the dyno and they all seem to make between 202-220 whp depending upon the dyno.

Tuning doesn't seem to get much peak HP on the S2000 as it comes pretty well maxed out from the factory. It takes cams or forced induction to make much difference other than fattening the power curve.

_________________
mobilito ergo sum
I drive therefore I am

I can explain it to you,
but I can't understand it for you.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: February 18, 2018, 4:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 6, 2009, 11:50 pm
Posts: 159
carguy123 wrote:
What HP did you guys make on the dyno. I've seen probably 100 S2000s on the dyno and they all seem to make between 202-220 whp depending upon the dyno.

Tuning doesn't seem to get much peak HP on the S2000 as it comes pretty well maxed out from the factory. It takes cams or forced induction to make much difference other than fattening the power curve.


My peak was 182whp and Steven's S2000 was 184whp. Here are a couple of other pretty much stock 2wd cars for reference:

Car / Factory HP / Dyno WHP
2002 M3 / 338hp / 243whp
2003 350Z / 287hp / 215whp
2004 S60 T5 / 247hp / 186whp
2000 S2000 / 237hp / 184whp
2015 Fiesta ST / 180hp / 147whp


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: February 19, 2018, 12:36 am 
Offline
Toyotaphobe
User avatar

Joined: April 5, 2008, 2:25 am
Posts: 4691
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Gosh no matter the dyno I've never seen an S dyno less than 199.xx.

I realize that different dyno systems have different ratings and that the main use for the dyno is a reference point. You try to use the same dyno with same temp conditions so as to make a valid comparison of gains or losses. But that's quite a bit lower than I'd expect. I wonder if he had small issues.

I was looking back through some old info of mine and it's actually closer to 150 S2000s I've seen dyno'd and even more if you count the ones that have been dyno'd several times as we did work on them. In other words it was close to 150 different cars, not 150 dyno runs.

The advantage your engine has is that it's easier and cheaper to add boost so it depends upon what your goals are as to which one is best. BUT, I prefer 9,000 rpm. It's exciting.

Yours has another advantage, it comes with a FWD transmission and the S2000 motor has to be adapted to one.

_________________
mobilito ergo sum
I drive therefore I am

I can explain it to you,
but I can't understand it for you.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: February 24, 2018, 7:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 6, 2009, 11:50 pm
Posts: 159
Another major project on the car I just completed was to upgrade the cooling system. The front vent, ducting, and damming I made last year was a huge improvement, and seemed totally adequate for the street and autocross. But when I got it on the track in the summer heat (30*C) it just couldn't keep up for a full 20 minute session. Since then I reduced the antifreeze content and added some water wetter to help, but I think i've now fixed it for good. I'm limited for space up front so a larger rad wasn't in the cards. I played around with ideas for mounting additional coolers in the back, and the only option that really seemed to work well for routing, placement, and airflow was to add some side pods in front of the rear wheels.

The H22 comes stock with oil squirters to cool the pistons, and an oil-water heat exchanger that goes between the block and the oil filter. My idea was to remove the stock heat exchanger and replace it with a thermostatic sandwich plate so I could send the oil off to it's own dedicated cooler instead further taxing the cooling system. Another bonus would be the increased oil capacity. The Mishimoto sandwich plate I went with worked out nicely as it has a built in changeable thermostat, and a place to put a temp sensor pre or post cooler (I have mine pre cooler). The coolant lines that used to go to the old sandwich plate now also run to their own cooler on the other side of the car.

Attachment:
20180224_141111.jpg
20180224_141111.jpg [ 452.19 KiB | Viewed 806 times ]

Attachment:
20180224_140946.jpg
20180224_140946.jpg [ 515.72 KiB | Viewed 806 times ]

Attachment:
20180203_163142.jpg
20180203_163142.jpg [ 494.23 KiB | Viewed 806 times ]


For the coolers I went with a pair of Derale 15865's. They're a -10AN 25 row cooler that comes with a shrouded fan, and are advertised at 46,000 BTU's/Hour. The oil cooler fan has it's own manual switch, and the fan for the auxillary cooler is tied in to the rad fan control, but also now has a manual override switch. Overall between the two additional coolers it's a 75% increase in cooling core volume so I think it should be good for even the hottest days at the track.

Attachment:
20180203_163117.jpg
20180203_163117.jpg [ 424.89 KiB | Viewed 806 times ]


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: February 24, 2018, 8:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 6, 2009, 11:50 pm
Posts: 159
I had a couple ideas for the scoops to cover the coolers so I started messing around with some cardboard. I wanted to keep them relatively easy to make, and match the rest of the curves and angles of the car. I also wanted to keep them inboard of the rear tires to avoid hitting cones, and as short as possible to avoid interfering with the ingress/egress of the cockpit. After I was happy with the general shape I thought I'd mock it up in SolidWorks and see what they looked like in body color.

Attachment:
20171201_123016.jpg
20171201_123016.jpg [ 363.72 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]

Attachment:
Side Scoops With Oil Cooler2.JPG
Side Scoops With Oil Cooler2.JPG [ 83.94 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]


I made them using a similar construction method as I used for the hood. I started with a wood frame that I could lightly glue some foam panels to, and then shaped the corners. I really like the 2" radius that I used in the SolidWorks model, but to tuck the scoop in as much as possible I had to reduce that to 1". It looks a little boxy, but also more closely matches the radii of the fenders and frame tubes so maybe it's not so bad. When I made the hood I used 3 layers of fiberglass on the top and 2 layers on the bottom and it came out bombproof. So, this time I used 2 on the outside and 1 on the inside, with a little extra at the leading edge to take abuse from cones. They feel really strong still and I don't think they'll have any issues with cones, but I don't know how well they will hold up if somebody accidentally stands on them when getting out of the car. I also spent a little more time with filler and sanding the outside so the overall finish came out much nicer than the previous parts I've made. The finishing touch was adding some ABS mesh grills to the fronts and rears to help protect the coolers from flying rocks.

Attachment:
20180103_070617.jpg
20180103_070617.jpg [ 407.72 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]

Attachment:
20180108_204401.jpg
20180108_204401.jpg [ 390.67 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]

Attachment:
20180113_153919.jpg
20180113_153919.jpg [ 301.62 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]

Attachment:
20180124_165752.jpg
20180124_165752.jpg [ 395.07 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]

Attachment:
20180129_115227.jpg
20180129_115227.jpg [ 355.64 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]

Attachment:
20180201_211746.jpg
20180201_211746.jpg [ 388 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]

Attachment:
20180203_163355.jpg
20180203_163355.jpg [ 403.33 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]

Attachment:
20180203_170000.jpg
20180203_170000.jpg [ 373.24 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]

Attachment:
20180203_170112.jpg
20180203_170112.jpg [ 367.93 KiB | Viewed 799 times ]


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: February 24, 2018, 9:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 22, 2005, 10:29 am
Posts: 411
Stellar work there, sir!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: February 24, 2018, 9:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: December 18, 2010, 3:29 pm
Posts: 70
How did you selectively leave the foam reinforcements on there and get the rest so clean? More details on your fiberglass process would be awesome, looks amazing!

Thanks,
Alex


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: February 25, 2018, 6:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 6, 2009, 11:50 pm
Posts: 159
ajmacdon wrote:
How did you selectively leave the foam reinforcements on there and get the rest so clean? More details on your fiberglass process would be awesome, looks amazing!

Thanks,
Alex


Thanks! My process was basically as follows:

1. Create a wood frame that was oversized in the areas/edges that would require final trimming but 1/2" undersize in width and height to account for the thickness of the foam. I also had to make sure I could disassemble it from the inside.
2. Lightly glue the 1/2" insulation foam down with some spray contact adhesive and shape the radius edges using a long board with 40/80 grit sandpaper.
3. Layup the outer fiberglass layers.
4. Disassemble the wood frame and gently separate the plywood from the foam. This is were it really pays of to use the glue sparingly.
5. Mark out and remove the areas of foam that I needed. This was all of the finished edges, anywhere bolts pass through, and anywhere I needed extra clearance for the frame that holds the coolers. I used a utility knife to cut along the lines and then cut in between the foam and fiberglass to remove the bulk of it. 40 grit sandpaper makes quick work of any leftover bits and cleans up the now exposed fiberglass.
6. Feather the foam edges using the utility knife and 80 grit sand paper.
7. Layup the inside fiberglass layer. Because this increases the stiffness so much you need to make sure that the part isn't distorted when curing. For the hood I had to make a cradle to support it from underneath and hold the exact shape. For these scoops I put a light elasticated cord around the outside and a cardboard brace inside to hold the top and bottom the correct distance apart. You can put packing tape over the edges of the cardboard so it doesn't soak up any resin or stick to it afterwards.
8. Trim all the edges to fit.
9. Filler, sand, repeat until happy or you just can't take working with fiberglass/body filler any more.
10. Paint and wrap in vinyl

Page 7 has some good step by step pictures of when I made the hood.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: March 10, 2018, 10:35 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: October 11, 2006, 4:49 pm
Posts: 546
Very nice moldless composite work.. your turn around time must be very quick vs plug/mold/part method.

_________________
build log http://locostusa.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=2142


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: March 10, 2018, 12:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: January 1, 2015, 1:55 pm
Posts: 197
Really nice looking buid!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: March 11, 2018, 12:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 6, 2009, 11:50 pm
Posts: 159
airframefixer wrote:
Very nice moldless composite work.. your turn around time must be very quick vs plug/mold/part method.


Thanks, that means a lot to me. The level of quality in your build is just phenomenal.

The turn around time is pretty quick. It took me about a week and a half to make these but I was only working on them for an hour before work and an hour after. I figure with curing times and what not I could have probably made them in 4 days, possibly over a long weekend.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: April 25, 2018, 9:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 24, 2011, 9:11 pm
Posts: 285
Location: Upstate NY
I haven't checked in a while and have missed your efforts. These side pod rads are awesome! Nice work!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 162 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
POWERED_BY